Archives for posts with tag: protest

What I like about this is how the police officer deliberately tries to confuse the issue, then calls the protester delusional.

Rachel is a 17 year old girl who was caught in the middle of the protests on Thursday. Her full account can be found here, but here is an extract:

According to Rachel, after begging in tears to be let out, she and her friends got through one police line but were then halted by another.

“We were traumatised at this point. We were crying. We’d been hit by police for just wanting to go home. We were begging to, please, just let us go home. They showed no mercy whatsoever.

“Then we got pushed forward a second time and as we were going forward we were saying ‘please don’t hurt us, just don’t hurt us, we want to go home’.

“I managed to break away. I was pushed into a ditch by a police officer and when I tried to get out of the ditch he pushed me back in.

“I turned around to see a group of my friends on the floor getting beaten by police officers.

“I received a text later from a friend who didn’t manage to escape, saying that he was thrown to the floor by the neck. He was beaten on the floor by three police officers until he was throwing up blood and when that happened they just threw him aside and didn’t give him any medical attention and went on to the next one.”

 

 

Alfie Meadows is a 20 year old student who suffered bleeding to the brain after being struck by a police truncheon. His mother can be heard here, while the incident has been referred to the IPCC as is standard. There’s little context to surround this incident, other than he was in the kettled area at the time. After a 3 hour operation, Alfie is recovering in hospital but his situation is serious. Hopefully there will be more on Alfie’s case in the next few days.

With a strike to the head by a truncheon the cause of this injury, it is a surprise that only 43 protesters were (officially) injured yesterday. It is also worth remembering that, while this is a footnote to the day, it is the most major injury suffered. Had this injury been received by a police officer, the coverage would be quite different.

Jody McIntyre (@jodymcintyre) is a young man in a wheelchair. He tells his story at his blog, which you can find here. The most salient information comes here:

From the corner of my eye, I spotted one of the policemen from the earlier incident. He recognised me immediately. Officer KF936 came charging towards me. Tipping the wheelchair to the side, he pushed me onto the concrete, before grabbing my arms and dragging me across the road.

Can any more information be shed on Officer KF936? Huge credit to Jody for telling his story so passionately and with clarity on his blog.

This blog is an independent project aimed at collecting all available data on police brutality. It has begun in the wake of numerous protests in the UK, culminating with the disorder that was seen in London on December 9th 2010. While various media outlets and organisations have attempted to portray the events of December 9th, and prior protests, as examples of wanton vandalism, unprovoked violence and calculated criminal behaviour on the part of the protesters, this blog refutes this. We aim to collect all data, pictures, videos, eyewitness accounts and testimony from those who have suffered through exercising their right to peaceful protest. The main blog will have individual stories, some taken from press (always attributed), some emailed and some taken from police. This blog also aims to provide information on your rights during a protest, the rights and responsibilities of the police, and links to other organisations and blogs in the same vein.

As you will be aware, this is a large task, and the blog may look sparse while data is collected, verified and posted. We aim to use this blog as a tool to combat the misinformation surrounding protests.

If you have anything you can contribute, please get in touch: eyewitnessbrutality [at] gmail dot com. Please include everything you can, including pictures, videos and, if possible, police collar numbers, or FIN numbers.